Through a Jungian Lens

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White on Black

with 9 comments

I have to admit that I find old Chinese architecture very interesting.  This is a detail from a traditional roofline found on most older buildings still found in China.  As I wander the city of Changzhou, I see frequent examples of this style still remaining.  Most are in some state of disrepair though functional.  Some, such as this one, have been carefully restored using original materials.  I chose this photo because of the simplicity of colour – just black and white against a “whitish” sky.

Then after choosing the photo and cropping it so that it seemed to be right for inclusion here, I saw more, the layering of the tiles as though I was seeing the layering of shadow.  I also saw in greater detail, the white flower which appeared to be growing out of a tree.  And then I saw the tree and was struck by the image that emerged, a symbol of man, potent man.  Out of the darkness, the light grows upwards.

I find my mind caught is a number of contradictions here, just as I find my mind caught in the contradictions of relationship.  The key to a good relationship is communication.  However, from what I said yesterday, the key to a good relationship is keeping one’s stuff to one’s self.  Sharp sums it up nicely:

Those who think that talking about a relationship will help it get better put the cart before the horse.  Work on yourself and a good relationship will follow.  You can either accept who you are and find a relationship that fits, or twist yourself out of shape and get what you deserve.

The endless blather that takes place between two complexed people solves nothing.  It is a waste of time and energy and as often as not actually makes the situation worse.”  (Sharp, Jungian Psychology Unplugged, p. 72)

Communication is served by silence, and consciousness is arrived at through darkness, through the unconscious.  How can I sense any truth to these paradoxes?  The image helps me.  I see the swollen member bursting forth with life and I think how that swollen member gives life only in the darkness of the mysterious, dark and moist inner world.  And in giving up the essence of self, there is a unity that allows the self to disappear into a wholeness in which there are no separations between darkness and light, between masculine and feminine, between self and other.

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9 Responses

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  1. “You can either accept who you are and find a relationship that fits, or twist yourself out of shape and get what you deserve”

    I wonder what the outcome would be if this was taught in schools. I also wonder what people, in general, would be like if philosophy was on the curriculum.

    Cedric

    October 25, 2010 at 6:36 pm

    • If it is taught in school, even less people would actually become aware. LOL! I say this because teaching is more about external rather than internal.

      Robert G. Longpré

      October 26, 2010 at 6:39 am

      • You’re right of course. Sadly. With two kids in school I notice it more and more, the complete failure of what we call our education system.

        Cedric

        October 26, 2010 at 4:57 pm

  2. ‘You can either accept who you are and find a relationship that fits, or twist yourself out of shape and get what you deserve.’

    He could not have been more direct than this.
    How many of us do this?

    abha

    October 25, 2010 at 7:35 pm

    • All of us? Even those of us who are not in a relationship with an outer other – there is still the inner other to deal with.

      Robert G. Longpré

      October 26, 2010 at 6:40 am

  3. there is a creature known as the ‘bone-eatting, snotflower worm’ – that feeds on the fat in whale bones on the sea bottom. inside the female can live up to 50 or 100 dwarf males…. (maybe they never talk and all keep to themselves… i doubt that however)
    i like knowing that life affords many many options and possibilities for a working and healthy relationships…
    as above so below (and vise versa)

    sproutingcrow

    October 25, 2010 at 9:31 pm

    • Good information 🙂 Thanks.

      Robert G. Longpré

      October 26, 2010 at 6:41 am

  4. I enjoyed the quote on relationships as well.

    John Baley

    October 25, 2010 at 11:40 pm

    • Thanks, John. I hope you return to add your words to the dialogue.

      Robert G. Longpré

      October 26, 2010 at 6:42 am


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