Through a Jungian Lens

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Kintsukuroi – Alchemical Gold

with 4 comments

Kintsukuroi - to repair with gold.

Kintsukuroi – to repair with gold.

I saw this image on Facebook and just had to bring it here. This version of the image is slightly enhanced with both colour saturation, increased contrast, and a few other slight touches. The ceramic bowl in this image is repaired using gold powder sprinkled on top of a lacquer resin. The result then becomes more beautiful.

The Japanese invented this technique Kintsukuroi / Kintsugi for repairing ceramics. I have recently read a few articles that speak of how we humans seem to repair ourselves in a similar fashion. Rather than denying the broken parts of our psyche, we embrace those broken parts in order to heal them. We carry the scars of our brokenness with us as we continue our life’s journey. Yet, those scars have been turned into gold, alchemical gold.

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Written by Robert G. Longpré

December 14, 2013 at 10:23 am

Posted in Jungian Psychology

4 Responses

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  1. What a beautiful parallel, Robert…and bowl, too.

    Scott

    December 14, 2013 at 11:00 am

  2. A beautiful and artful technique that improves on the previously broken and unusable piece. A striking metaphor for the healing of the wounded psyche. I am not a “counsellor” of any sort but I would think that if the client were presented with a vision like this as they set out on their journey to healing it would be a powerful device to aid them in seeing the possibilities ahead.

    This really struck me. It seems to resonate with a sort of patience and wisdom that discovered a way to not just recover the piece that had been lost but make it even more beautiful.

    Bill Rathborne

    December 14, 2013 at 2:43 pm

    • Thank you, Bill. I agree with you about the visual/visceral image that it would give a client in terms of hope.

      rgl

      January 23, 2014 at 6:24 pm

  3. Alas, I seldom see people do this in counseling. they intellectually can grasp it, but can’t seem to do it.

    Urspo

    December 15, 2013 at 8:11 pm


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